Do Atlanta’s African-American landmarks really matter?

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The Herndon House. Paschal’s. Atlanta Life Building. These buildings and more need to be saved.

It has been 45 years since my father, J.W. Robinson Sr., an African-American architect, founded his firm in Atlanta. Growing up during a time of segregation, J.W. developed a passion for preserving our architectural and cultural history. Atlanta, a city filled with rich African-American history, became his ground zero.

Atlanta used to be a place to see and experience a variety of buildings that African Americans owned and developed for business, entertainment, worship, and housing. Now we may face a future in which our African-American landmarks are only experienced through photographs, and our architectural heritage learned about only in textbooks.

What is the state of landmarks that are owned, operated, or designed by African Americans that J.W. so passionately tried to preserve? Dire. I say that as an Atlanta native carrying on my father’s legacy as a practicing architect. The last decade has shown that most people don’t understand the significance of our historic buildings. Nor do they care about their contributions or realize how minimal the commitment is to protect our architectural and cultural history. What does this say about our city? And more importantly, how should we move forward? [Read more…]

2013 – The Georgia Historic Trust 2013 Excellence in Rehabilitation Award

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Georgia Historic Trust 2013 Excellence in Rehabilitation Award – J.W. Robinson & Associates, Inc is
pleased to announce being the 2013 recipient of the Excellence in Rehabilitation award from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

Huntington Hall built in 1908, originally served as a dormitory for female students. It now houses the offices of the President, Vice President, as well as Administrative Support Offices, Student Affairs and Lounge.

J.W. Robinson & Associates, Inc. designed this project in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.